April 27, 2021

An Oldie in Grayslake

57 Railroad Ave., Grayslake. Photo from Realtor site.


Sears Modern Home No. 103, later known as the Lucerne.


The porch has been enclosed and the front door is now on the side.


There is a one-story addition off the back, and the upstairs layout remains unchanged from the original plan. Photo from Realtor site.


Chicago architect Alfred L. Flegel designed the Sears No. 103.


The floor plan shifted with the addition. Photo from Realtor site.


The second story has two decent sized bedrooms and a full  bath.


The enclosed porch. Photo from Realtor site.


The see-through fireplace is new, and the reception hall has been merged with the living room. The staircase is also new. Photo from Realtor site.


The dining room leads to the new kitchen as part of the addition. Photo from Realtor site.


Photo from Realtor site.


The Sears No. 103 is right in downtown Grayslake. Sears Roebuck began selling homes in 1908, and this home was built between 1908-early 1910. 

In 1910, Grayslake (then called Grays Lake) had a population of 603, but was growing. Gus Schultz, wife Lena, and four kids moved out from Chicago and built the Sears house. Gus owned a barber shop in town.


A 1914 ad advertises Grays Lake as a vacation spot. As a local businessman, Gus is listed as a town booster. The "condensery", the milk plant shown  in the photo, was built in 1912 on the same street as the Schultz house.


Today the 80-foot smoke stack from the factory still remains and has been incorporated into a park. Some people call it: "Grayslake's Hollywood Sign".


Lena died in 1921, and Gus sold the house in 1922 to the Kreuzer family.



1 comment:

Architectural Observer said...

Surprisingly, I actually like the stucco exterior even though it appears to be a later modification. It's fun to see such an old example of a Sears house; the later designs are so much more common. The inclusion of a reception hall and vestibule within this relatively small five-room plan is illustrative of the cultural priorities back then versus the way we live and build today.

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